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52 Weeks of Trails - Week 44- Triangle Lake

In case you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!

 

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LENGTH & DIFFICULTY

5 km  | 2-3 hours |  Moderate

The Triangle Lake Trail beckons those who love the mossy, wet rainforest that thrives in coastal British Columbia.  On a rainy day in late fall, the trail is saturated beyond belief; the leaves left on trees are drooping at the weight, and the mushrooms are thriving.  There must have been at least 15 different types of fungi just littering the trail and the trees-- an incredible display of colours, sizes, and shapes.  At the trailhead, you are immediately faced with a well signed fork to choose either a route to Trout Lake or Triangle Lake.  At almost twice the length, Trout Lake is a great choice for those looking for a longer day on the trail-- plus its flagged for both hiking and mountain biking.  Triangle Lake is posted as hiking only- and given the terrain it's probably for the best.

A combination of soft, leaved covered paths with rooty, rocky scrambles inbetween make for a fun and interesting trail, despite waiting to have any viewpoint until over 3km in when you reach the lake itself.  Once at the lake, there is an immediate viewpoint straight ahead with a nice bench to rest.  If you choose to do the entire loop around the lake (about 1.7 km) you'll enjoy the rolling hills with multiple views over the boggy lake. 
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According to the Sargeant Bay Society, "Triangle Lake is not actually a lake, but a true bog, a special type of wetland that is quite uncommon at low elevation on the Sunshine Coast. It is almost entirely surrounded by rocky ridges and receives its water only from rain."  This bog is home to a unique eco-system and it's important that hikers respect the area for its fragile plants and animals.  Beyond the tree frogs and old growth trees, the signage explains that Triangle Lake is also located on the traditional terriorty of the Sechelt First Nations.  In Shishalh language, the lake is called "S-ch'ewk'", meaning "Fried Bread Lake".  With its woody debris covering much of the lake, its easy to understand!

TRAIL MAP & DIRECTIONS: 

Follow Hwy 101 7km north of Sechelt into the community of Halfmoon Bay.  Take a left onto Redrooffs Rd.  Once you pass the entrance to Sargeant Bay Provincial Park on your left, you'll want to pull over in the pull out immediately on your right.  There are several yellow posts-- this is the trail head to Triangle Lake as well as Trout Lake.
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Share your adventure on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.

52 Weeks of Trails - Week 43- Mud Lake Trail

In case you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!

 

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LENGTH & DIFFICULTY

4+km  | 2-3 hours |  Easy (hike); Moderate (mtb)

The trail to Mud Lake is interconnected within the Duck Lake Trails network.  Given that many of the trails loop and criss-cross, it gives you lots of options for picking your route.  From the starting point, you can take any number of paths to get to Mud Lake, but the most straighforward, direct path is just about 1.8km one way.  If you'd like a longer hike, you can most certainly make that happen by combining your route with a stop at Duck Lake or heading further north to Haslam Lake.  The Mud Lake Trail is marked with grey-on-red trail markers. 

As soon as you enter this trail you are greeted by a beautiful wooden bridge that leads to a fire pit surrounded by handmade benches. Quaint wooden walkways are sprinkled throughout this trail and if you head north on the trail first, you will pass by Haslam Lake, Stewart Lake AND Deer Lake. Deer Lake is the jewel of this trail with a picnic spot overlooking the serene lake. You are sure to make a few frog friends during this hike!  This is also a great hike for you and your dog. Be prepared to come across a few other four-legged friends, so keep your dog on a leash.
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Mountain biking is permitted on the trail, but the conditions can vary greatly making it a less desirable biking area at times, largely due to thick mud in the rainier seasons.  If you do plan to ride, the beginning portions are slightly more technical (roots, off-camber) but are worth the rewarding smooth singletrack that follows.

Reminders:
• This is a multi-use trail frequented by mountain bikers- so be kind and yield to other users on the path.
• Pack water and some snacks or your stomach will be growling at you by the end.
• Stay bear and cougar aware! Bear claw scratches were seen on some of the trees.
• Don’t wear white running shoes and expect them to stay that colour on the Mud Lake Trail!

mudlake1TRAIL MAP & DIRECTIONS: 

From town, take Joyce North and then turn left onto Manson Ave. Take the first right onto Cassiar St and then the first left onto Yukon St. From there turn right onto Haslam St and follow it until you come to a fork in the road. Go right onto the gravel road called Haslam Lake Rd. You will come to three roads. Stay right. Follow this for 5 to 10 minutes until you see a large concrete block with “Squirrel Crossing” written on it on the left side of the road. You will see this trail right before reaching the tip of Duck Lake. There is ample space for parking on the side of the road. Once inside the trail there will be signage to guide you through.


Share your adventure on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.

52 Weeks of Trails - Week 42- Porpoise Bay Provincial Park Trail

In case you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!

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LENGTH & DIFFICULTY

2km  | 15 minutes - 1 hour |  Easy

The trail system in Porpoise Bay Provinicial Park is very well maintained and easy to follow.  The trails center around Angus Creek, which flows through the park to the Angus Creek estuary and then into Sechelt Inlet.    In the late fall there is a large salmon spawn here, and viewing the fish is a major attraction.  On this day in October there were several visible chum salmon in the creek.   Other trails in the park wind beneath large fir, cedar, hemlock, and maple trees.

The paths are quiet soft and wide, and in October were completely covered in beautiful fall foliage.  When you start on the path its only a short hop to the creek, with one branch off prior to the ampitheater.  Once you reach the creek, you can go left or right.  Going right takes you further up alongside the shallow creek and eventually to the ampitheater, and turning left takes you downstream to a bridge and eventually the beach.  Both directions can easily be explored in a short time.  The trail is friendly to all manner of users so as always, be respectful of one another and pick up after your dog.

TRAIL MAP & DIRECTIONS: 

At the main intersection in Sechelt (Hwy 101 and Wharf Road), turn north on Wharf Road.  At the next stop sign, take a left onto Sechelt Inlet Road and then drive approximately 4km to the entrance to Porpoise Bay Provinicial Park on your left.  Once inside the park, follow the signs to the ampitheatre.  When you reach the parking for the ampitheatre you'll see the trailhead.

Share your adventure on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.
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