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52 Weeks of Trails - Week 41- Dinner Rock

In case you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!

 

Length & Difficulty:

7km Roundtrip | 2-3 hours |  Moderate

 

dinner rock

Dinner Rock Trail, also known at the Browne Creek Trail, is a great hike that combines piney forest and ocean views.  The arbutus trees along the route are quite spectacular as well, especially in the fall as the neat orangy-red bark becomes even more vivid in colour.  The area is well suited for hiking and mountain biking, so be mindful of the other users on the path.  The beginning of this trail along Browne Creek is a nice, wide, flat biking trail, and even has a few "slow down" signs. Along this trail you could see many snakes and frogs among the ferns and forest. 

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While you could shorten your hike to just head to Dinner Rock and back, a major highlight of this trail is the swimming and beach area at Hurtado Bay, as well as the lookout point where you can see the southern tip of Savary Island and the northern tip of Harwood Island, so take your time to check out Hurtado Bay while you're at it!

 

 

DIRECTIONS: dinner rock map

Drive north of Powell River about 23km towards Lund and take a left at Dinner Rock Campground. A little ways down you'll see a Browne Creek trailhead sign on the right and that will be the starting point. There is some space to park at that trailhead and a good place to leave your vehicle if you are doing the entire loop.


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hurtado

52 Weeks of Trails - Week 40- Atrevida Loop

In case you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!

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Length & Difficulty:

4.3km Roundtrip | 1-2 hours |  Moderate

 

The Atrevida Trail off of Highway 101 north of Powell River features old growth Douglas fir veterans, as well as an outdoor museum with remnants of an old car indicating 1930’s style. Drive shaft, wheels, axels and other rusty artifacts have been arrayed along the edge of the trail. Please leave all objects in place, even the few remaining bottles that may be found in historic dumps along the route.

 

From the junction of Alberni Street and Marine Avenue (Highway 101) drive almost 16 kilometers north toward Lund. About 100 meters shy of Atrevida Road, on the east side of the highway, the yellow sign of the Atrevida Trail beckons high in the trees by the old burned telephone pole. Park on the west side of the highway.  Check out this trail map from bikepowellriver.ca.

atrevida3Step across the ditch and into the narrow highway right-of-way. Once inside of the forest, an old logging road has been cleared of brush, woody debris and deadfall. After a 30-meter climb you will come upon a junction where the loop diverges; this is where you will emerge again in an hour. Stay on the main trail to the right. You will cross the corner of a logged area and pass another path turning left to leaning tree junction. Keep straight on the well-trodden grade. The young mixed forest gives way to older two-to-three-foot diameter fir trees. At the one kilometer marker there is a turnoff to the right, which is the south view ridge trail to south view road and Wilde creek loop.

Stay left on the main trail and within a few minutes you will pass by a short spur trail on the right. A few steps further up the loop there is an erratic huge boulder left by the ice age. Vanilla leaf grows prolifically beside the trail.

To continue the Atrevida Loop up at Toquenatch Connector junction, keep left and enter the avenue of veterans. This kilometer long section of the loop is no longer old logging road but a well-trodden hiking trail with a few giant Douglas fir veterans. They are estimated to be roughly 1000 years old.


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Aerial over Lund harbour and the Atrevdia Loop trail

52 Weeks of Trails - Week 39- Chapman Creek Falls


Chapman 17a

In case you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!

Length & Difficulty:

8km Roundtrip | 3 hours |  Moderate

 

Chapman Falls is one of those places in my years of living on the Sunshine Coast that I had heard about—but I’d never seen any pictures, didn’t know how to get there, and the couple times I spotted it on a map it looked like a very long and daunting hike. I made the decision to tackle the trail anyway for Week 39 of the 52 Weeks of Trails challenge. To my surprise—the trail was not very difficult and the falls were far beyond my expectations—absolutely spectacular!

While there are multiple ways to access the Chapman Creek trail network—I decided to start at the new trail leading from the airport towards the Chapman Creek bridge. This section is designated as part of the Suncoaster Trail, and the plan is to continue connecting trails along the Coast until you can reach the Earl’s Cove ferry terminal, many sections of which already exist (and will be featured in upcoming ’52 Weeks’ blogs).
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Stand overtop rushing water at the Chapman Creek Bridge

From the trailhead to the bridge, you’ll wind through beautiful forest complete with many old growth stumps that are quite impressive. There are a few small hills but for the most part the path is relatively flat with several small bridge paths over soggy spots, which helps keep you somewhat mud free even in rainy weather. This area would be excellent for mountain biking and trail running, and would almost be wheelchair accessible except for a those couple of hilly spots. After approximately 1.8km, you reach the Chapman Creek bridge. The creek rushes below and on this late September day was lined in fisherman—one of whom was in the middle of reeling in a large Coho salmon!



The trail to the falls continues on past the bridge—but be aware, I did not see a single sign pointing to the falls, so be sure to bring a map as there are a few turns and those with a poor sense of direction could get turned around. The next fork in the trail you’ll see a sign pointing back to "Chapman Bridge" or left to “Davis Bay/Selma Park”; take the left.  After that you'll reach another split—this time a 3 way fork—follow the sign pointing to the “SELMA PARK POWER LINES”. The steepest section of the trail is here, but rest assured its short and then continues back to mostly flat terrain. When you reach the power lines, head across the clear cut under the lines, follow the trail slightly to the left, and then you’ll see the trail head back into the woods on your right. Again, there’s no sign, so pay close attention. From there, you’re past most of the forks and turns and can just follow the trail all the way to the falls. You will meet back up with a gravel road for short bit until you get to the pump house— then continue through the yellow ‘SCRD’ signs and you’re just a few more minutes of hiking away from the falls.


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Large metal walkways lead you over a gorge to the falls

Now, I said it once, and I’ll say it again, the falls are absolutely spectacular! It’s actually a series of 3 large waterfalls, one right after the other. The volume of water spilling down these cliffs was astounding! There is a path right to the cliffs edge to give you a decent look at the falls, but please use utmost caution. The cliff areas surrounding the falls are wet, slippery, and incredibly steep, so use at your own risk. Take your time, enjoy the sound of the rushing water, and soak in the beauty of the forest.

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Trail Map

To get to the trail head from Gibsons, head north on Highway 101 and turn right on Field Road by the Shell station and the Wilson Creek Plaza.  Drive to the end of Field Road and turn left onto Hilltop Road.  Drive to the end of Hilltop and park on your left where you will see the "SunCoaster Trail" sign and map board.

Create Maps or search from 80 million at MapMyHike



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