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52 Weeks of Trails - Week 35- Mount Troubridge


In case you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!

Hike to Mount Troubridge-- Length & Difficulty:

11 km (from Rainy Day Lake) | 4-5 hours up, 3-4 hours down | Very Challenging

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Over the course of our 52 weeks so far, we've challenged you to several legs of the Sunshine Coast Trail, Canada's longest hut-to-hut hiking trail set in our very own Powell River backyard.  Needless to say, it's incredible.  Over 180km, the trail covers everything from low lying, coastal hiking on up to higher peaks like Tin Hat and this week's Mount Troubridge.  This week's trailhead is accessible by car via a logging road-- or you can tie it in to a longer hike within the Sunshine Coast Trail.  Should you want to make a multi-day trip out of it, try starting at the Saltery Bay Ferry Terminal and following our directions to the Fairview Bay Hut and Rainy Day Lake. You can then continue on for this week's challenge to Mount Troubridge.


Directions (or view the Trail Map)

Hiking through the mist

 

Drive South on Highway 101 until you reach the Saltery Bay Ferry Terminal, but turn LEFT at the stop sign immediately before the ferry booth. This road will bring you to the SCT kiosk and the trailhead for Fairview Bay on your right, or will continue on as an uphill gravel road towards Rainy Day Lake on your left. You can start the hike here and spend a night at the Rainy Day Lake Cabin before continuing up to Troubridge in the morning (see Rainy Day Lake hiking directions), or if you have a 4x4 vehicle you can drive up to Rainy Day Lake and start the Troubridge hike from there.

Jocelyn PondFrom the logging road:

Park at the 4x4 access to Rainy Day Lake (the second entrance, where the sign says “Rainy Day Lake 1.8km”), and then keep walking up the logging road for a few hundred meters. You will see the trail access for Mount Troubridge (Sunshine Coast Trail – North) on your LEFT.

From the Rainy Day Lake Cabin:

Leaving the cabin, take a LEFT in the fork in the road and follow the Sunshine Coast Trail North. Hike for 1.8 km until you come to a logging road, and then turn RIGHT. In a few hundred meters you will see the trail access for Mount Troubridge (Sunshine Coast Trail – North) on your LEFT. This trail will continue on for a few kilometers until you come to a power line and a beautiful view of Jervis Inlet and Nelson Island. Turn LEFT on the logging road here. You will quickly come to a fork in the road- take the path going up on the RIGHT (there is a post marked SCT here) and look for a rocky road leading back into the trees on your LEFT (there is a very visible “Mount Troubridge” sign that you can see from the gravel, but finding the path is a little more tricky). The path will be a little overgrown here for about kilometer, but then it starts to clear up. Follow the orange squares for the rest of the path until you reach the summit just before km 159 and an amazing log cabin beside Jocelyn Pond just after km 158.

Highlights:

• On a clear day, there is a beautiful view from the summit

• On a cloudy day you will be hiking through the mist of the clouds, making the forest look magical

• There is a beautiful pond by the cabin

• Troubridge is the highest point on the SCT, so you’ll feel very accomplished at the top!

Notes:

The old emergency shelter at the summit isn’t the cabin- don’t worry when you see it!

The sign at the summit that says “New Sunshine Coast Trail” will take you down to the Troubridge Cabin or on towards Elephant Lakes

Hiking from Fairview Bay to Rainy Day Lake is a good test of your ability to hike Troubridge, as the slope is about the same gradient



Share your adventure on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.
Masterwork Log Cabin

52 Weeks of Trails - Week 34- Snickett Park

In c
ase you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!


Week #34- Snickett Park

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Snickett Park, located in the heart of Sechelt, is an easy access, wide, and mostly paved path/trail along the Sechelt waterfront. Offering gorgeous, panoramic views of the Strait of Georgia as you walk alongside the beach, this is a trail the whole family can enjoy. A nearby resident and world renowned blue poppy expert, Bill Terry, has planted several beds of Himalayan blue poppies, and each spring they put on a beautiful show of striking sky blue flowers. According to Terry Barker, author of a Walk in Snickett Park, the park was named by Annie Whitely, a Yorkshire woman who lived near there in the early 1900’s. “Snickett” is a Yorkshire term for ‘narrow path’.

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The entrance to the park is located on 5440 Shornecliffe Ave at Hwy 101, just across from the Sechelt Courthouse. As you walk into the park, the trail leads to stunning rock outcroppings that provide excellent views. Follow the trail to your left which after a short distance goes out of the park and simply becomes the Boulevard, the wide sidewalk that wraps around the beach. You can follow this for quite a distance down the coastline until you reach the gravel conveyor belt that extends into the water.

Don’t miss the impressive Salish totem poles that look out over the water—they recount the history of the Sechelt Indian Band, the first in Canada to gain self-government in 1986.
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Share your adventure with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram using hashtag #52weeksoftrails
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52 Weeks of Trails - Week 32 - Powell River Forest Canoe Route

In c
ase you missed it, we've introduced our challenge to you for 2014-- 52 Weeks of Trails.  Each week we'll blog about a trail (hike, bike, snowshoe, and paddle!) and we hope you enjoy and share your experience with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and/or Instagram using #52weeksoftrails.  Happy Trails!


Week #33 - Powell River Forest Canoe Route

The coastal community of Powell River offers easy access to more than 30 lakes including the world-famous Powell Forest Canoe Route, a semi-circle of eight lakes and portages. The best time of year to go is between June and October, so now is the time to get paddling!  Get ready for 48 miles of canoeing and 6.4 miles of portaging. Along the route you will find 20 recreation campsites, well maintained portages and conveniently located canoe rests. You can comfortably canoe the route in 5 days but leave yourself ample time to complete the route - don't rush!

Expect enrapturing visuals: soaring coastal mountains laden with cedar, fir, and spruce trees overlook fjord-like waters, and wildlife sightings, from bald eagles to black bears, are always possible.

Powell-Forest-Canoe-RoutePhoto courtesy of Tourism Powell River

GETTING THERE

Once you’re off the ferry at Saltery Bay, drive north for approximately 10 km; you’ll see the entrance sign on the right side of the road across the highway from Loubert Road (entrance to the community of Stillwater). After turning right, drive up the hill and approximately 5 km in, you’ll be at the start of the Route, Lois Lake Campsite. It is not recommended to start from the north end of the route due to the steep grade along the Windsor-Goat portage.

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ON THE ROUTE

Once again, we suggest taking all the time you can to explore the beauty of this incredible chain of lakes.  Your portages are often through beautiful old growth forest and the lakes are peaceful, serene, and generally calm.  With any paddling, you'll want to be prepared for your longer paddling stretches by watching and predicting weather patterns so you are not paddling through rough waves and strong winds.  Paddle earlier in the day to avoid gusty winds and wind down at your campsite early to enjoy a great dinner, swimming, and the overall beauty of the area.

If you dont have a full 5 days, a popular 3 (or relaxing 4) day trip is to start at Windsor Lake so that you can descend to Lois. You get in the majority of the circuit, and the most beautiful portion too. A great 2 day trip is paddling Lois Lake and then through the canal into Khartoum Lake.

If you are need of supplies or services, including canoe rentals, outdoor gear, transportation just help with the logistics of planning a bigger trip, Mitchell's Canoe & Kayak in Powell River is the place to go!


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with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram using hashtag #52weeksoftrails

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