While there are options for every type of camper on the Sunshine Coast, it’s hard to beat these ten epic spots. The following list covers everything from provincial parks to private campgrounds to marine and backcountry sites. 

Don’t snooze on these, either—campsites on the Sunshine Coast tend to book up quickly. For parks that accept reservations, make sure to book ahead of time, or opt for shoulder season months when your chances of snagging that coveted beachfront spot are better. 

1. Roberts Creek Provincial Park, Roberts Creek

This forested provincial park backs onto Roberts Creek beach and offers spacious sites with firepits and picnic tables. In summer, the towering cedar, Douglas fir, and Hemlock trees provide ample shade for lounging during the hottest part of the day. Prefer to cool down with a dip instead? A short ten-minute walk from the campground leads to a rocky beach with views of Vancouver Island in the distance. While there are no on-site amenities other than pit toilets and drinking water, the campground’s location between Gibsons and Sechelt makes it an ideal base for exploring the Coast. Head to B&K or Sprockids for mountain bike trails that descend through second-growth forest. Or play a round of nine at the Sunshine Coast Golf & Country Club, located just up the road. Grab some takeout from Sharkey’s Fish Locker or The Gumboot Cafe and make your way to the oceanside Roberts Creek Mandala for dinner with a view.

Reservations required: Yes

Type of campground: Provincial park

Who for: City dwellers looking for easy access to nature, big groups, campers who like close access to amenities and activities, mountain bikers 

2. Porpoise Bay Provincial Park, Sechelt

This provincial park is popular with families, thanks to its location on the relatively calm Sechelt Inlet, its large on-site playground, and grassy picnic areas that are perfect for lounging, cartwheeling, and picnicking. Campers will find both individual and group sites, plus two day shelters. In the summer, the park’s amphitheatre hosts events and nature presentations, while fall brings cooler weather, fewer campers, and spawning salmon in Angus Creek, which winds through the campground. Looking to explore Sechelt Inlet by water? Rent kayaks or stand-up paddleboards from Pedals and Paddles, a short ten-minute drive up the road in Tuwanek. Bikers will appreciate close access to the gravity-defying trails of Coast Gravity Park, also located a short drive from the campground.

Reservations required: Yes 

Type of campground: Provincial park

Who for: Families with little ones, mountain bikers looking to shred Coast Gravity Park, Sunshine Coasters who want an easy staycation, campers who like close access to amenities and activities

3. Desolation Sound Marine Provincial Park, Lund

The eleven backcountry campsites scattered throughout Desolation Sound form a string of basecamps for kayakers on a multi-day paddling adventure. Tucked away on small islands, rocky bluffs and in cozy bays, Desolation Sound’s campsites all offer simple amenities and spectacular scenery. There are nine tent pads at each site, available on a first-come, first-served basis. Pit toilets can be found at Grace Harbor, Tenedos Bay, Curme Islands, Bold Head, Hare Point, Feather Cove, Copeland Islands, and Melanie Cove. These are wilderness sites so campers will need to bring their own toilet paper, drinking water, food, and supplies. Backcountry fees apply.

Reservations required: No

Type of campground: Marine provincial park, wilderness

Who for: Kayakers, boaters, backcountry lovers, those that like lots of adventure and fewer amenities 

4. Inland Lake Provincial Park, Powell River

What makes Inland unique is the 13-kilometre, fully accessible trail that loops around the entire lake. The trail is made up of a series of wide, flat boardwalks, bridges, and crushed limestone path and includes washrooms and shelters at five locations. Prefer to spend your time on the water? This park offers great swimming, fishing, canoeing, and boating. The campground itself has wide, flat sites, firepits (plus firewood for sale), a boat launch, drinking water, picnic areas, and pit toilets. Located 12-kilometres north of Powell River, Inland Lake campground is just a short drive away from restaurants, shops, art galleries, museums and more. Mountain bikers can access the city’s many trail networks (including the Mount Mahony trails and Gallagher Hill) directly via the campground’s Inland “Loon” Lake Trail, a 10-kilometre moderate dirt and gravel path trail. 

Reservations required:  Yes

Type of campground: Provincial park

Who for: Those with accessibility needs, families with little ones, Sunshine Coasters looking for an easy staycation, campers who like close access to amenities and activities, mountain bikers 

5. Mt. Richardson Provincial Park, Sechelt

Mt. Richardson Provincial Park spans ocean to mountain, and offers sprawling vistas of the Sechelt peninsula and inlet. The park’s only vehicle-accessible campsites are located in the alpine near Richardson Lake and require 4-wheel drive to access. The sites are rustic and available on a first-come, first-served basis. While the campground is open year-round, expect heavy snowfall and tough conditions to navigate during winter. The rewards in all seasons are worth it, though: hiking and snowshoe trails abound, and the scramble up to Richardson Summit is only a moderate nine-kilometre out-and-back trail from the campground. Prefer to stick close to the water? Campers will find three boat-accessible sites at Oyster Beach, Nine Mile Point and Tuwanek. These are wilderness sites so be prepared to pack all necessary supplies and amenities. 

Reservations required: No

Type of campground: Backcountry, 4×4 vehicle-accessible camping, provincial park

Who for: Those that like lots of adventure and fewer amenities, 4×4-accessible vehicle campers, alpine fans, hikers 

6. Plumper Cove Marine Provincial Park, Keats Island

Located on the northwest side of Keats Island, this small marine park is a short boat ride (including via BC Ferries) or paddle from Lower Gibsons, making it one of the more easily accessible wilderness campsites on the Sunshine Coast. The campground itself is well-managed and maintained and offers a small anchorage, one wharf, and mooring buoys. Paddlers and boaters will find wheelbarrows for hauling gear, along with large, spacious sites, firepits, toilets, drinking water, and a grassy field with apple trees that’s perfect for sprawling out to enjoy the sunset. There are multiple beach access points from the campground—ideal given the shallow waters of Keats warm quickly on a hot, summer day. Looking to stretch your legs? Campers will find a short trail system around the campground and plenty of beachfront to explore. 

Reservations required: No

Type of campground: Marine provincial park

Who for: Boaters and paddlers, city dwellers looking for easy access to nature, Sunshine Coast locals looking for an easy staycation, those that like lots of adventure and fewer amenities, island escapists 

7. Halkett Bay Marine Provincial Park, Gambier Island

Framed by the soaring mountains and rugged shoreline of Howe Sound, Halkett Bay is one of the more spectacularly scenic campgrounds on the Coast. This well-used anchorage draws boaters, paddlers, and scuba divers for its deep moorage, wreck sites, and easygoing vibe. You don’t need to take to the water to access this prime oceanside spot in Howe Sound, either. Gambier Island is accessible via BC Ferries from Gibsons and the island’s wide, well-graded dirt paths are easy to navigate on foot or bike. Make Halkett your home base for a weekend (or longer) and explore the island’s many beaches, coves, and trails, including Mount Artaban, which is located five-kilometres from Halkett Bay campground. Boaters will find an overnight mooring, provided by one buoy and a dinghy dock to reach the shore. 

Reservations required: No

Type of campground: Marine provincial park

Who for: Boaters and paddlers, city dwellers looking for easy access to nature, Sunshine Coast locals looking for an easy staycation, those that like lots of adventure and fewer amenities, island escapists 

8. Shelter Point Regional Park, Texada Island

Beach lovers, take note: Shelter Point Regional Park offers exceptional access to Gillies Bay, one of the best beaches on the Sunshine Coast. There are two places to camp at Shelter Point. The park’s main campground offers great amenities, including a boat ramp, beach volleyball courts, a concession stand, flush toilets, and showers. Planning to take the RV or fifth wheel? Campers will find a sani-dump and spacious lots. A second campground (Bella Maria) offers additional lots if Shelter Point is full. While the regional park is open year-round for camping, some of the on-site amenities are only accessible during summer months. From Shelter Point, the short, five-minute drive to Gillies Bay will also have you within walking distance of a general store (ideal for refreshing your beach snacks) and other amenities. 

Reservations required: Yes

Type of campground: Private

Who for: Boaters, island escapists, Sunshine Coasters looking for an easy staycation, city dwellers looking for easy access to nature 

9. Homesite Creek, Halfmoon Bay

This quiet recreational site in Halfmoon Bay offers 30 forested lots next to Homesite Creek. There are both tent and RV sites available, along with an accessible campsite with its own accessible outhouse. The campground’s group site can accommodate multiple campers or a large family looking for extra space to spread out. Amenities are basic and simple (there are fire pits, pit toilets, and picnic tables), but the campground’s convenient location between Sechelt and Halfmoon Bay means you’re never far from trails, restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, shops, and more. Hikers will find plenty of trails to walk right from the campground, including a section of the Suncoaster Trail, which spans 37-kilometres through lush forest from Egmont to Secret Cove. Not up for a longer hike? A series of short paths will lead you into the surrounding forest and in view of flowing waterfalls

Reservations required: Yes

Type of campground: Recreation site

Who for: those with accessibility needs, waterfall chasers, city dwellers looking for easy access to nature, Sunshine Coast locals looking for an easy staycation, those that like lots of adventure and fewer amenities

10. Pascal’s Place, Savary Island

Located toward the south end of Savary Island, Pascal’s Place is tucked away in the forest, offering plenty of privacy and shade for those hot Savary summer days. It also happens to be located close to the tropical-like sandy shores of South Beach, meaning ocean dips and beach lounging are easily within reach, too. Pascal’s Place is the only campground available on the island and during the summer it books up fast (make sure to reserve well in advance). Sites are $10 a night and include access to a bathroom and kitchen facilities. Not feeling up to cooking? The island is home to a general store and pub, both of which offer ready-to-eat food and snacks. Since Savary Island is only accessible by boat or water taxi from Lund, you’ll need to be prepared to pack over your supplies by foot—and pack out what you use. 

Reservations required: Yes

Type of campground: Private 

Who for: Island escapists, beachgoers, those that like lots of adventure and fewer amenities, boaters 

Find more places to stay on the Sunshine Coast